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Hello from Liza Talusan

Hello from Liza Talusan

Hello Park School!

My name is Liza Talusan, and I serve as the Director of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. I am new to Park School, but the commitment to these important issues have been a part of the fabric of our community since the beginning. So, it is such an honor and privilege to be able to support and encourage our faculty, staff, students, and parents through this life-long journey.

Though I am new to Park School, many of you have known a member of my family for quite some time. Jorge Vega, Park’s Director of Technology, was at Park School from 2005-2010 and returned in July 2014. Yes, we are married. Yes, he’s one of my favorite teachers of all time. Yes, he is as funny at home as he is at Park. Little known fact: did you know that Mr. Vega got his start teaching theater? That’s right!

Over my 17 year career in education, I have worked in both independent preK-12 schools and in higher education. Most of my professional work has been in diversity and equity education, focusing on access, support and engagement around issues of inclusion. I am one of the rare people who loves strategic planning and thinking, institutional assessment, and, yes, even public speaking!

Jorge and I are not the only ones related at this school, though. Our three children all started at Park School this year. And, though we have quite a commute to school (sometimes almost 2-hours!), the children and I can’t wait to get to Park each morning and really have to pull ourselves way from it in the evenings. Jorge and I are lucky that we have children in each division (Evan is in Lower; Jada is in Middle: and Joli is in Upper), so we get to see Park School from the viewpoint of people in all three divisions.

It has been a wonderful first few months at Park. I am so thankful that parents, teachers and students feel comfortable coming into the office (I’m in the 2nd grade hallway), saying hello whenever they see me running around the hallways, and joining me for committee meetings and educational workshops.

I hope to meet you in person soon, too!

Peace,

Ms. Talusan

 

 

Honoring Latino and Hispanic Heritage Month

Nationally, the United States honors the dates between September 15 – October 15 as Hispanic Heritage Month. While we at Park strive to provide inclusive engagement of communities all year, this time allows us to pay particular attention to Hispanic and Latino communities.
Below are some helpful resources that you might try in your classrooms. It may even be small changes like adding a book from the list or including an activity during the week.
  • PBS has great video clips and discussion topics about diverse issues facing Latino and Hispanic Americans
  • National Education Association has a list of easy-to-adapt activities for grades K-12
  • Time Magazine for Kids┬áis also a great resource for printable lessons and teaching resources
  • Finally, one of my favorite resources is Mamiverse, and this site includes a diverse list of books featuring themes, characters and issues related to Latino and Hispanic issues
How might you include issues in math or science? Highlight researchers, scientists, scholars and inventors ofLatino or Hispanic heritage. Use examples that impact Latino and Hispanic communities as you create math problems or problem sets (e.g., demographics, cultural references).